Twister

Twister


Her hair was a corkscrew mane, brown streaked with copper. She had it managed with two thick strands circling her skull like a frizzy halo. A few curls bounced free in silent rebellion as she leapt over the side of her 1965 Ford Mustang convertible, army boots digging into the red desert sand. She was older now—19 and forever wild—her years measured by the quantity of bumper stickers on the silver bumper. True to her namesake, she was an unstoppable force: her words a whirlwind, her actions a juggernaut of long strides. Her bold exterior barely concealed a sizzling temper, and she burst into the room boot-first and dropped down at the nearest table with an ungraceful thump. Sweat had moistened her ruby red tank top. Dust clung to her brown shorts. She was sun-kissed and reckless, loud and untamed. The color of her lips matched the cherry charms dangling from her twice-pierced ears. The bartender brought her a glass of water (she surely needed it), and her face split into a grin as thanks. When he asked her what she needed, she shook her head, indicating that she needed no thing and no one, because she was an entirely independent girl.

It was 1988. She was an outlaw and a saint, a rebel and a scamp. She was free.

––

A little creative writing to go along with this edit I made, in honor of the first day of July. The summer months always inspire me. It might even be the start of a miniseries.

© 2017 Obliquity of the Ecliptic

Mermaid Short Film Recommendations

MerMay might be over, but I still thought I’d cover ten of my favorite mermaid short films, music videos, and related cinematographic content. Actual movie recommendations may come in a later month since I have many to suggest, but right now, I’m just focusing on short videos:

  1. Kiss of a Siren by NuMe, which earned Best Film at the 2014 International Fashion Film Awards.
  2. Psycho Princess: The Little Mermaid by the Vancouver Film School. It is one of their multiple renditions of popular fairy tales with dark twists.
  3. Mermaid: A Twist on the Classic Tale by Nicola Alexandra, a fan-made movie trailer for the Little Mermaid.
  4. The Disappearance of a Girl by Phildel. This music video does not actually contain any mermaids but is more mermaid-themed, as many of Phildel’s music videos are.
  5. The Angry Mermaid by Friends of the Earth International, which seeks to raise awareness and promote action regarding climate change and ocean conservation.
  6. Compendium II: The Sirens also by the Vancouver Film School. It is part of a series that is a re-imagining of the classic tale of Odysseus.
  7. Kristen McMenamy: The Little Mermaid by Tim Walker, from his series “Far, Far From Land” for W Magazine, in which supermodel Kristen McMenamy gracefully floats in a human-size fish tank. Walker’s article and photography can be found here
  8. The Little Mermaid, the classic animated short film from 1975 which closely follows the original story by Hans Christian Anderson
  9. The Mermaid Short by Wizz, an CGI Animated short film
  10.  No Ordinary Love by Sade, an iconic music video from 2009 that tells the story of a mermaid in love

If anyone has any others to add, I would love to hear suggestions.

© 2017 Obliquity of the Ecliptic

A Review of Illuminae and a Word on Acknowledgments

With the arrival of summer comes more freedom and possibility, like exploration and discovery through the medium of literature. Book-reading has always been a great past time of mine, especially in the summer months when I’m not so busy. There’s just something so satisfying about returning from the library with a bag full of books, knowing you can read them at your leisure and not be forced to study them for an assignment.

My most recent conquest was the first installment of a sci-fi/action series by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff, The Illuminae Files. Book 1, Illuminae, is very uniquely formatted, with 599 pages of chat logs, emails, classified documents, data reports, video footage summaries, the stream of consciousness of a psychopathic AI, and more. In fact, because it is so unique, it can be very confusing at times, which is why for the first 200 pages I was generally very lost and just trying to enjoy the ride until things became clear.

(Thankfully, they did. I just had to be patient.)

This is not my first experience with one of these authors. In the past, I’ve read the first of Kristoff’s Lotus War trilogy, Stormdancer. A fantasy novel set in feudal steampunk Japan, it has historical elements combined with thrilling fantasy lore, like griffins and flying ships. Unfortunately, I was too busy at the time to continue the series, despite its good quality, but perhaps this summer I’ll start them again and finish.

Amie Kaufman has also co-authored a series before, the Starbound Trilogy. I cannot attest to its quality, having never read it, but I assume it’s good because it is a New York Times bestseller.

Anyway, to say that Illuminae was emotionally stirring is an understatement. This book was a wild ride from start to finish, even if I didn’t always understand what was happening. But the beauty of it is that I didn’t need to fully understand the sequence of events taking place to feel the love, excitement, terror,  panic, and hope of the characters. It’s a good quality to have in a novel, Young Adult and otherwise, because it’ll keep people engaged until the very end.

I won’t summarize the plot too much, because the less known about it, the better. But basically, it’s set in the year 2575 and features a pink-haired, headstrong heroine named Kady Grant, her smarmy ex-boyfriend Ezra Mason, and two megacorporations at war over the planet Kerenza, which—guess what?—happens to be the planet the two protagonists live on. I guess you could say it’s a story truly out of this world.

…anyway.

Wonderfully written, I highly recommend giving it a read. Yes, because of its length, it could take a good deal of time to finish, but I can assure you that once you really get into it, the end will come faster than you think.

And this brings me to my next point, which is the beauty of acknowledgements and the realizations they bring. Because at the end of this book, the two authors took the time to thank their editors, advisers, agents, artists, family, friends, and other contributors. The list of people involved, whether it be to proofread rough drafts, provide emotional support, or offer insight into the realm of astrophysics, is so lengthy that it spans multiple pages. Though some acknowledgements were fairly standard (“Our families . . . thank you for your constant support”), others were surely unique, praising specific doctors for giving medical knowledge and engineers for giving computer knowledge and even a certain Christopher Guethe for giving a tour around the NASA Jet Propulsion labs.

It reminds us, the readers and amateur writers of the world, to not only be humble and grateful for all the help given to us, but also that writing a book is not a one-man act. Of course, we don’t usually think this to be true. The reputation of a writer is that of a loner, one who sequesters his or herself from the world for months on end to pour their heart and soul into their latest work. Throughout history, the most famous writers are often characterized as social pariahs and tragic, lonely individuals, and this is certainly true.

For the most part. But not always.

You don’t have to be an expert in the field of thermonuclear astrophysics to write good science-fiction (even though it’d certainly help). What you need to have is a good team of friends, family, and experts who can help and support you until the very end. It’ll help produce a higher quality of work and will also help you finish (sometimes the hardest aspect of part of the writing process).

And remember: just like how reading is a form of exploration, writing is a form of escape. Even if fictitious stories have realistic aspects in them, they can still be used by the writer to escape reality, and this is a wonderful thing. So while the whole mentality of “writing what you know” is true to an extent, it doesn’t have to be true.

Those are my thoughts for now. I’ll be updating more frequently now because, as I mentioned before, it’s summer and I’m not so busy. I hope I’ll be able to continue to read and review great books like Illuminae in the future.

© 2017 Obliquity of the Ecliptic

The Best of Mermaid Art

We’re halfway through the month of MerMay, and I’ve seen a great variety of styles, like Dylan Bonner‘s Disney-style digital painting:

#mermay day 2! I wanted to make this one totally different from day 1 in terms of feel and color pallet. #mermay2017 #digitalpainting
Salie Chelon‘s pastel glittering graphic:
And Nati‘s mixed-media aquamarine drawing:
These are just a few of the many beautiful pieces I’ve come across. I recommend checking out artists Daniel Kordek, Philia Lina, Lady Shalirin, Jessica Madorran, and Erika Schnellert for more. Searching the #MerMay tag on Instagram and Tumblr never fails either.

While all this new art is refreshing, I’d like to recall some old favorites of mine, which include both classic mermaid paintings and general digital designs worthy of recognition. Obviously, I can’t include all my favorites, but I’ll certainly include some of the best.

Cabinet of Curiosities Mermaid by Alexandra V. Bach

fantasyartwatch: “Cabinet of Curiosities Mermaid by Alexandra V Bach ”

the Siren Song series by Victor Nizovtsev

belaquadros: “Victor Nizovtsev ”

The Five Sisters by Annie Stegg

megarah-moon: “  “The Five Sisters” by Annie Stegg From Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little Mermaid” ”

Fate by bayardwu

somethingmoresubtle: “ Fate by bayardwu ”

The Little Mermaid by Itsuko Azuma

c0225849_1572262.jpg

Ariel the mermaid by Andra Hancock

fish-tails-siren-scales: “ by Andra Hancock ”

Out of Water by Saiful Haque

cinemagorgeous: “ Out of Water by artist Saiful Haque. ”

La Petite Sirene and the Mermaid Project by Renee Nault

Image result for la petite sirene renee nault

Mermaid Drop by sakimichan

Image result for mermaid sakimichan

Atargatis by Annie Stegg

Image result for Atargatis” - Annie Stegg

Jeune naiade by Paul Émile Chabas

Image result for Paul Émile Chabas (1869-1937) - Jeune naiade

Ulysses and the Sirens by Herbert James Draper

"Ulysses and the Sirens" by Herbert James Draper (1909)

Water nymph by Christian Schloe

Image result for christian schloe art

Mermaid by Charles Murray Padday

Image result for charles murray padday

And finally, Little Mermaid by Mily Knight

Little mermaid by milyKnight

That’s all for now. I always love discovering new art, especially when it involves mermaids, so I’m open to suggestions. And I’d like to remind everyone that all the artwork above is not my own and I claim no ownership of it. All rights reserved for the respective artists.

© 2017 Obliquity of the Ecliptic

How To Breathe Underwater Like a Mermaid

Science is slowly but surely actualizing the possibility of being a mermaid. In this article, it is stated: “Scientists have made a breakthrough that could save patient’s lives and open up the possibilities for underwater exploration.”

Essentially, a tiny micro-particle (roughly 3 micrometers) was created that can be injected into the bloodstream, oxygenating blood without any help from the lungs. These particles contains three to four times more oxygen than human red blood cells, and they can allow humans to live up to 30 minutes without breathing before respiratory failure occurs. Though originally created for medical purposes (to prevent brain damage or organ injury from oxygen deprivation), it also opens the door for military uses or solutions to air pollution.

Or being a mermaid. Imagine being able to swim in the ocean without breathing for three times as long as a dolphin could. Or sit at the bottom of a pool for half an hour, watching the light dance on the tiles.

And this discovery was several years ago. Recent reports indicate these micro-particles are continually being used to save lives in hospitals and prevent environmental pollution by letting a crew fix underwater damage to oil rigs without scuba equipment. I can only imagine how this will continue to progress as it becomes more well-known.

Also, there appear to be no known negative side effects from it. In this article, they are described as a minuscule capsules of small bubbles of oxygen surrounded by a layer of lipids. Meaning that as long as they are injected in regulated amounts, they are completely harmless.

Now this is much different from perfluorocarbon, a breathable liquid which holds just enough oxygen for us to breathe it in safely for short periods of time. While perfluorocarbon sounds cool, the transition from breathing it in to breathing in actual air can be painful, since your lungs have to push the liquid from them. Which is why it’s (apparently) been used as a torture device, similar to water boarding.

But to focus on the matter at hand…

Perhaps saying “breathing underwater” is misleading, since technically, this advancement in science allows you to simply hold your breath for extended periods of time. But either way, it certainly has a wide range of possibilities, and I would love to experience it myself one day.

© 2017 Obliquity of the Ecliptic